Hellenismo

The true roots of Europe
Le vere radici dell'Europa

October 2, 2014 3:30 pm
Ὀγδόη Ἱσταμένου, VIII day From today’s sunset: eighth day of Pyanepsion. Theseia, in honor of the Hero: solemn procession, sacrifices and common banquet of the whole population, agones. Sacrifice to the Amazons. Kybernesia. “That the war (against the Amazons) ended in a solemn treaty is attested not only by the naming of the place adjoining the Theseum, which is called Horcomosium (from the oaths of ratification) but also by the sacrifice which, in ancient times, was offered to the Amazons before the festival of Theseus.” Plut. Thes. 27.5 “The chief sacrifice which the Athenians make in his honor (Theseus) comes on the eighth day of the month Pyanepsion, the day on which he came back from Crete with the youths. But they honor him also on the eighth day of the other months, either because he came to Athens in the first place, from Troezen, on the eighth day of the month Hecatombaion, as Diodorus the Topographer states, or because they consider this number more appropriate for him than any other since he was said to be a son of Poseidon.” Plut. Thes. 36.3 “Philochorus says that Theseus got from Skiros of Salamis Nausithous for his pilot, and Phaeax for his look-out man, the Athenians at that time not yet being addicted to the sea, and that Skiros did him this favour because one of the chosen youths, Menesthes, was his daughter’s son. And there is evidence for this in the memorial chapels for Nausithous and Phaeax which Theseus built at Phalerum near the temple of Skiros, and they say that the festival of the Kybernesia, or Pilot’s Festival, is celebrated in their honor.” Plut. Thes. 17 The eighth day is always sacred to Poseidon and Theseus. “Poseidon Asphaleios stands for the ogdoad.” “The eighth and the ninth of the month that begins: these are the best days to accomplish the man’s works: (Hesiod) praises the eighth and ninth plausibly as they carry perfection (syntelestikai) and therefore he has dedicated them to the human activities…one (the eight), by having a perfect dimension, the other (the nine), by deriving from a perfect number (the three), bring to accomplishment the works undertaken in them.” Schol. Erga, 772-773 (Votive relief honoring Theseus. The inscription identifies the figures as Theseus (on the left) and Sosippos (the figure in the centre), who dedicated the stele. Sosippos raises his hand in a sign of prayer, symbolically presenting his son to the beloved Athenian Hero… From Attica, 400 BCE, now at the Louvre…)

Ὀγδόη Ἱσταμένου, VIII day
From today’s sunset: eighth day of Pyanepsion.

Theseia, in honor of the Hero: solemn procession, sacrifices and common banquet of the whole population, agones.
Sacrifice to the Amazons.
Kybernesia.

“That the war (against the Amazons) ended in a solemn treaty is attested not only by the naming of the place adjoining the Theseum, which is called Horcomosium (from the oaths of ratification) but also by the sacrifice which, in ancient times, was offered to the Amazons before the festival of Theseus.”
Plut. Thes. 27.5

“The chief sacrifice which the Athenians make in his honor (Theseus) comes on the eighth day of the month Pyanepsion, the day on which he came back from Crete with the youths. But they honor him also on the eighth day of the other months, either because he came to Athens in the first place, from Troezen, on the eighth day of the month Hecatombaion, as Diodorus the Topographer states, or because they consider this number more appropriate for him than any other since he was said to be a son of Poseidon.”
Plut. Thes. 36.3

“Philochorus says that Theseus got from Skiros of Salamis Nausithous for his pilot, and Phaeax for his look-out man, the Athenians at that time not yet being addicted to the sea, and that Skiros did him this favour because one of the chosen youths, Menesthes, was his daughter’s son. And there is evidence for this in the memorial chapels for Nausithous and Phaeax which Theseus built at Phalerum near the temple of Skiros, and they say that the festival of the Kybernesia, or Pilot’s Festival, is celebrated in their honor.”
Plut. Thes. 17

The eighth day is always sacred to Poseidon and Theseus.
“Poseidon Asphaleios stands for the ogdoad.”
“The eighth and the ninth of the month that begins: these are the best days to accomplish the man’s works: (Hesiod) praises the eighth and ninth plausibly as they carry perfection (syntelestikai) and therefore he has dedicated them to the human activities…one (the eight), by having a perfect dimension, the other (the nine), by deriving from a perfect number (the three), bring to accomplishment the works undertaken in them.”
Schol. Erga, 772-773

(Votive relief honoring Theseus. The inscription identifies the figures as Theseus (on the left) and Sosippos (the figure in the centre), who dedicated the stele. Sosippos raises his hand in a sign of prayer, symbolically presenting his son to the beloved Athenian Hero…
From Attica, 400 BCE, now at the Louvre…)

11:21 am
"Demeter" (1807, Artist: Augustin Chevalier. Baltimore, Peale Museum Courtyard)

"Demeter"
(1807, Artist: Augustin Chevalier. Baltimore, Peale Museum Courtyard)

October 1, 2014 4:33 pm
Ἑβδόμη Ἱσταμένου, VII day From today’s sunset: seventh day of Pyanepsion. Pyanopsia, in honor of Apollo; preparation of the ‘panspermia’; eiresione (public and private ritual); private sacrifices to Artemis and Apollo; Most probable day also for the Oschophoria, in honor of Dionysos and Athena Skiras - so called ‘festival of the vintage’; sacrifices to Konnidas. *** The seventh is sacred to Apollo, as the symbolic day of His birthday. “Celebrating the seventh day as the birthday of Apollo: therefore the Athenians honor this day as Apollonian, carrying branches of laurel, crowning the basket (kanoun) and singing hymns to the God.” “So, because of the harmonious relationship, he (Hesiod) adapted the seven to the birth of Apollo and, for the fact that it (the seven) has no mother and is inconvenient for women, he has said that it is sacred to Athena.” Schol. Erga 769-771 (Iris or Hera (?) holding out in the right an oinochoe as if to catch the wine which falls from the fluted phiale of Apollo, who faces Her, playing on the kithara and wreathed with laurel. On the left Nike runs forward to right, holding up her left hand. From Attica, 490BC-460BC (circa), now in the British Museum…)
cf. “Calendario Religioso: Tradizione Ellenica” http://hellenismo.wordpress.com/2014/08/27/calendario-religioso-tradizione-ellenica-religious-calendar-hellenic-tradition/

Ἑβδόμη Ἱσταμένου, VII day
From today’s sunset: seventh day of Pyanepsion.
Pyanopsia, in honor of Apollo; preparation of the ‘panspermia’; eiresione (public and private ritual);
private sacrifices to Artemis and Apollo;
Most probable day also for the Oschophoria, in honor of Dionysos and Athena Skiras - so called ‘festival of the vintage’;
sacrifices to Konnidas.

***
The seventh is sacred to Apollo, as the symbolic day of His birthday. “Celebrating the seventh day as the birthday of Apollo: therefore the Athenians honor this day as Apollonian, carrying branches of laurel, crowning the basket (kanoun) and singing hymns to the God.”
“So, because of the harmonious relationship, he (Hesiod) adapted the seven to the birth of Apollo and, for the fact that it (the seven) has no mother and is inconvenient for women, he has said that it is sacred to Athena.”
Schol. Erga 769-771

(Iris or Hera (?) holding out in the right an oinochoe as if to catch the wine which falls from the fluted phiale of Apollo, who faces Her, playing on the kithara and wreathed with laurel. On the left Nike runs forward to right, holding up her left hand. From Attica, 490BC-460BC (circa), now in the British Museum…)

cf. “Calendario Religioso: Tradizione Ellenica” http://hellenismo.wordpress.com/2014/08/27/calendario-religioso-tradizione-ellenica-religious-calendar-hellenic-tradition/

1:15 pm
Again, for the Proerosia in honor of Demeter… with all our Best Wishes! “Demeter and a farmer”; Anonyme, Chantilly, musée Condé.

Again, for the Proerosia in honor of Demeter…
with all our Best Wishes!
“Demeter and a farmer”; Anonyme, Chantilly, musée Condé.

September 30, 2014 2:56 pm
Stamnos fragments showing Demeter, Persephone, and Triptolemos. About late 5th century B.C. now in the Boston Museum…

Stamnos fragments showing Demeter, Persephone, and Triptolemos. About late 5th century B.C. now in the Boston Museum…

2:47 pm
Ἓκτη Ἱσταμένου, VI day From today’s sunset, it is the sixth day of Pyanepsion. It is sacred to Artemis as the symbolic day of Her birthday. Proerosia, in honor of Demeter (see below) Sacrifice to Theseus (Genos of the Salaminioi) It is also a very auspicious day (defeat of the giants). It is not a good day for marriages nor for the procreation of girls. “He (Hesiod) wants the sixth day to be inappropriate to the generation of girls, no matter that it is sacred to Artemis as the Goddess’ birthday . So She was born before Apollo, in order to witness the birth of Her brother. It will not be conveniently sacred to the birth of the Goddess, the first sixth day, which is perfect…? Artemis then, that is the one who completes the fetuses and declares the natural principles which govern the matter, it is quite natural that has been generated, according to the myth, on the sixth day. It is equally natural that this day is not suitable for the generation of girls, this Goddess in fact dominates the splendor of the Moon, is a virgin and does not want to generate.” (Demeter and Persephone, from stamnos fragments showing Demeter, Persephone, and Triptolemos; about late 5th century B.C. now in the Boston Museum…)

Ἓκτη Ἱσταμένου, VI day
From today’s sunset, it is the sixth day of Pyanepsion.
It is sacred to Artemis as the symbolic day of Her birthday.

Proerosia, in honor of Demeter (see below)

Sacrifice to Theseus (Genos of the Salaminioi)

It is also a very auspicious day (defeat of the giants).
It is not a good day for marriages nor for the procreation of girls.
“He (Hesiod) wants the sixth day to be inappropriate to the generation of girls, no matter that it is sacred to Artemis as the Goddess’ birthday . So She was born before Apollo, in order to witness the birth of Her brother. It will not be conveniently sacred to the birth of the Goddess, the first sixth day, which is perfect…? Artemis then, that is the one who completes the fetuses and declares the natural principles which govern the matter, it is quite natural that has been generated, according to the myth, on the sixth day. It is equally natural that this day is not suitable for the generation of girls, this Goddess in fact dominates the splendor of the Moon, is a virgin and does not want to generate.”

(Demeter and Persephone, from stamnos fragments showing Demeter, Persephone, and Triptolemos; about late 5th century B.C. now in the Boston Museum…)

September 29, 2014 2:46 pm
Πέμπτη Ἱσταμένου, V day From today’s sunset: fifth day of Pyanepsion. On the fifth day of Pyanepsion, according to the Sacred Calendar of Eleusis (IG II2 1363), has to take place the prorresis of the Proerosia: “In the Eleusinion (in the City), the Hierophant and the Sacred Herald receive a drachma and three obols for their meal on the fifth day of Pyanepsion when they announce the beginning of the Proerosia .” (IG II2 1363, 3-7). By this announce, the Hierophant invited all the citizens to take part into the celebrations of the next day, celebrations held specifically in Eleusis and which had surely something to do with the sacred ploughing of the holy Eleusinian fields. (Black-figured kylix, a representation of ritual ploughing. From Attica, 560BC-550BC (circa), now in the British Museum…)

Πέμπτη Ἱσταμένου, V day
From today’s sunset: fifth day of Pyanepsion.
On the fifth day of Pyanepsion, according to the Sacred Calendar of Eleusis (IG II2 1363), has to take place the prorresis of the Proerosia: “In the Eleusinion (in the City), the Hierophant and the Sacred Herald receive a drachma and three obols for their meal on the fifth day of Pyanepsion when they announce the beginning of the Proerosia .” (IG II2 1363, 3-7). By this announce, the Hierophant invited all the citizens to take part into the celebrations of the next day, celebrations held specifically in Eleusis and which had surely something to do with the sacred ploughing of the holy Eleusinian fields.

(Black-figured kylix, a representation of ritual ploughing. From Attica, 560BC-550BC (circa), now in the British Museum…)

September 28, 2014 10:14 am
Τετρὰς Ἱσταμένου, IV day From today’s sunset: fourth day of Pyanepsion. The fourth is always sacred to Aphrodite Pandemos, to Hermes and to Herakles, as the symbolic day of Their birthday. Honors are paid to Eros and Hermaphroditos. Banquet of the Tetradistai. “So it is no wonder that the ancient cooks were au fait in sacrificial rites; they presided, for instance, at weddings and festivals. Hence Menander, in his Flatterer, makes the cook on duty at the fourth-day club-feast (Tetradistai) or the day of Aphrodite Pandemos, speaks as follow: ‘Libation! Round with the tripe! Mind what you do. Come Sosias, boy, libation! Good for you! And now pour out. To all above we will pray both Gods and Goddesses (take the tongue), and may Life, Health, and many a blessing come of this, and those we’ve got Heaven grant we never miss!” Athenaios 14. 659D, describing a private celebration of the Tetradistai in Aphrodite’s honor. “But take care to avoid troubles which eat out the heart on the fourth of the beginning and ending of the month; it is a sacred day: especially during these sacred days it is convenient to get rid of all the activities that make you suffer, which, if at other times you need to choose them as necessary, in these days you should not.” The fourth day is also a suitable day for marriage. (Lekythos shaped in the form of Aphrodite rising from an open shell, with two Erotes hovering above. From Eretria, mid-4th century B.C. now in the Boston Museum…)
Τετρὰς Ἱσταμένου, IV day
From today’s sunset: fourth day of Pyanepsion.
The fourth is always sacred to Aphrodite Pandemos, to Hermes and to Herakles, as the symbolic day of Their birthday.
Honors are paid to Eros and Hermaphroditos.

Banquet of the Tetradistai.
“So it is no wonder that the ancient cooks were au fait in sacrificial rites; they presided, for instance, at weddings and festivals. Hence Menander, in his Flatterer, makes the cook on duty at the fourth-day club-feast (Tetradistai) or the day of Aphrodite Pandemos, speaks as follow: ‘Libation! Round with the tripe! Mind what you do. Come Sosias, boy, libation! Good for you! And now pour out. To all above we will pray both Gods and Goddesses (take the tongue), and may Life, Health, and many a blessing come of this, and those we’ve got Heaven grant we never miss!”
Athenaios 14. 659D, describing a private celebration of the Tetradistai in Aphrodite’s honor.

“But take care to avoid troubles which eat out the heart on the fourth of the beginning and ending of the month; it is a sacred day: especially during these sacred days it is convenient to get rid of all the activities that make you suffer, which, if at other times you need to choose them as necessary, in these days you should not.”

The fourth day is also a suitable day for marriage.

(Lekythos shaped in the form of Aphrodite rising from an open shell, with two Erotes hovering above. From Eretria, mid-4th century B.C. now in the Boston Museum…)
9:15 am
Terracotta figurine of a sleeping Eros (Museum of Paestum)

Terracotta figurine of a sleeping Eros (Museum of Paestum)

September 27, 2014 2:23 pm
Τρίτη Ἱσταμένου- Τριτομηνίς, III day From today’s sunset: third day of Pyanepsion. From today’s sunset, it is Τριτομηνίς, the third of the month and sacred to Athena, as the symbolic day of Her birthday. In this day, Athena Tritogeneia is also identified with Selene. A public festival was held each month during this day to honor the Goddess. It is sacred also to the Charites. (Fragment of a cameo, Athena.  For the whole description: http://www.tomswope.com/classical/images/AthenacameoCookcataloguetext.png)

Τρίτη Ἱσταμένου- Τριτομηνίς, III day
From today’s sunset: third day of Pyanepsion.
From today’s sunset, it is Τριτομηνίς, the third of the month and sacred to Athena, as the symbolic day of Her birthday. In this day, Athena Tritogeneia is also identified with Selene. A public festival was held each month during this day to honor the Goddess. It is sacred also to the Charites.

(Fragment of a cameo, Athena.
For the whole description: http://www.tomswope.com/
classical/images/AthenacameoCookcataloguetext.png)